Archive | February, 2015

Where there’s fire, there’s smoke

…and sometimes poor air quality.

Cold temperatures often lead to nights snuggled up in piles of blankets with a good book by the fireplace. But the wood-burning fire that’s keeping you cozy might be harmful to our air. How you build your fire and what you burn can have a significant impact on air quality and health. Wood smoke contains ozone-forming gases and fine particles — also called PM2.5 — which can harm the lungs, blood vessels and heart. Reduce the amount of smoke your fire produces to help improve our air quality. Keep the following tips in mind to build a cleaner fire that produces less smoke:

What to burn:

  • Burn only dry, seasoned wood. Wet or green logs create excessive smoke and waste fuel. Listen for a hollow sound when you strike two logs together as an indication of proper seasoning.
  • Hardwoods burn hotter. Soft woods like pine and cedar catch easily and make good kindling, but hardwoods burn longer, hotter and with less smoke once the fire is burning.
  • Never burn household garbage, cardboard, painted or treated wood, or any wood that contains glue, such as plywood or particle board. These items release toxic chemicals when burned, and if you’re using a wood stove they can damage it.

How to build:

  • Start a small fire with dry kindling, and then add a few pieces of wood. Be sure there is space between the pieces of wood and give the fire plenty of air until it’s roaring.
  • Try building a “top-down” fire to maximize heating performance and reduce smoke. It also reduces the amount of work needed to keep the fire going.

Be safe!

  • Wood-burning stoves or appliances should operate without producing smoke. If you see or smell smoke, there is a problem with your appliance. Check EPA’s Burn Wise program for more tips to keep you safe and while you stay warm.
  • And always make sure you have working smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors in your home!
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Congratulations to our 2015 SWMD grantees!

One of the most important things the MARC Solid Waste Management District (SWMD) does is provide financial support to organizations in our region for projects that reduce the amount of material we send to landfills. The district receives funding every year from the fees collected from the state’s landfills and transfer stations. Half of that amount is used to fund local waste reduction, reuse and recycling projects through a grant program.

We are very proud of our 2015 group of grant recipients and excited about their projects. The district could not accomplish its waste diversion goals without our grantees!

The 2015 grant projects are:

  • Avenue of Life: $203,492 to support the second year of a regional mattress recycling program.
  • Bridging The Gap: $79,740 to provide one-on-one consultations and assistance to businesses interested in starting new or expanding existing recycling programs.
  • City of Kearney: $5,700 to purchase a container to collect electronics at the Kearney Drop-off Recycling Center.
  • Kansas City Design Center: $30,000 to design a comprehensive, appealing and convenient recycling system for downtown Kansas City.
  • Meredith Car Sales & Recycling: $19,916 to purchase a trailer and hold at least 10 electronic recycling collection events in Cass County.
  • Missouri Organic: $4,000 to purchase carts and establish a paper towel composting program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City campus.
  • Missouri Recycling Association: $12,000 to support costs for a keynote speaker and AV equipment at the annual recycling conference scheduled for September in Kansas City.
  • Project Central: $47,044 to work with five schools to set up recycling and/or composting programs.
  • Southeast Enterprises: $12,000 to support transportation costs associated with a regional holiday light recycling program.
  • Sleepyhead Beds: $7,000 for staffing to conduct six mattress collection events and six presentations in the region north of the Missouri River. Sleepyhead Beds holds these events to collect quality used mattresses which are sanitized and provided to children in need.
  • The Rehabilitation Institute: $80,000 to collect and divert durable medical equipment from the waste stream. Equipment is then either repaired and made available for reuse, or recycled.
  • Truman Heritage Habitat for Humanity ReStore: $49,434 to provide a truck and staffing at the Lee’s Summit Resource Recovery Park to capture reusable materials before they enter the landfill.

Visit the Solid Waste Management District’s website to learn more about the grant program.

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