Tag Archives: compost

Spring Into Recycling

Gardener looking at base of plastic plant pot for recycling symbolSpring has sprung, which probably means you’re itching to get outdoors to clean and landscape your yard. This year, make it extra clean and green by recycling.

Mulch it over

Instead of bagging your grass clippings and leaves, mulch them instead. Mulching provides a natural lawn fertilizer, helps prevent weed growth, conserves water, and protects waterways from stormwater-runoff pollution.

If mulching isn’t an option, you can take your lawn and garden waste to a community collection center. Some yard waste drop-off facilities also offer mulch or compost at low cost. Search RecycleSpot to find a center near you.

A number of communities also offer curbside yard waste collection in addition to regular trash and recycling services.

Get composting Spring is a great time to install a compost bin in your backyard. In addition to making a great natural fertilizer, composting is a great way to reduce the 20-30 percent of your household trash that is made up of food waste and lawn and garden waste.

Search by community in RecycleSpot to see if your city is one of them (and call to verify). If you don’t have municipal leaf and brush curbside collection, there are private companies that also manage lawn refuse. RecycleSpot includes a list of many providers — contact them to find out about costs and procedures.

They lurk in your garage

Dangerous lawn and garden chemicals put the health and safety of your family and the environment at risk. Safely dispose of hazardous chemicals through a household hazardous waste program. These programs also take paint, automotive fluids, cleaners, bug sprays, batteries, fluorescent light tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs and other household products labeled danger, warning, or caution.

Pots and trays and bags, oh my!

When you’re done landscaping, recycle your plastic planting pots, trays and landscaping product bags (packaging for mulch, topsoil and other soil amendments). After a quick rinse, pots and trays can be recycled in your curbside bin or be taken to area recycling centers. After a thorough rinse (i.e., they’re 100-percent clean and dry) landscaping product bags can be recycled with plastic bags at your local grocery or “big box” store.

For more information on recycling, visit RecycleSpot, Kansas City metro area’s one-stop spot for recycling, reuse and waste reduction information.

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Make your Super Bowl recycling list

Video by KSHB

Video by KSHB

The hosts of Kansas City Live went up against a fifth grader to find out what is recyclable at a Super Bowl party. Now, it’s your turn. Here’s a list of items that may show up at your party and where they can be recycled:

  • Plastic containers (tubs for dips, veggie/fruit and dessert trays) – Most plastic food and beverage containers are recyclable curbside and at recycling centers. No Styrofoam food or beverage containers are recyclable.
  • Glass bottles and jars – Glass food and beverage containers are recyclable in the big, purple Ripple Glass bins located throughout the metro area. The metal lids are recyclable curbside and at recycling centers. Large metal lids (like salsa jars) can go directly in the recycling bin, while small metal lids and bottle caps should be put in a tin can with the top crimped shut. This will keep them from falling through the sorting machinery.
  • Chip bags – Most chip bags are not recyclable because they are made from multiple types of plastic. For example, if it has a shiny foil interior it’s not recyclable. Bags that are definitely recyclable are the clear tortilla chip bags. These bags can be recycled at any big box store or grocery store that has a bin for plastic bag recycling.
  • Disposable plates, cups and utensils – The plastic types are not recyclable due to food contamination and low value of plastic resin. Paper plates and cups can be composted in your backyard compost bin. A greener alternative is to use your regular dishware or durable plastic dishware that can be washed and used over and over again.
  • Paper napkins – Can be composted in your backyard compost bin. A greener alternative is to use cloth napkins.
  • Grocery sacks – Both plastic and paper are recyclable. Plastic bags can be recycled at any big box store and grocery store that has a bin for plastic bag recycling. Paper bags are recyclable curbside and at recycling centers. A greener alternative is to use reusable bags.
  • Cracker boxes – Made from paperboard, i.e., flat cardboard, these are recyclable curbside and at recycling centers. The plastic bag inside can be recycled at any big box store and grocery store that has a bin for plastic bag recycling.
  • Aluminum foil & trays – Aluminum foil products can be recycled at several recycling centers in the metro area.
  • Pizza boxes – The key is to tear it in half: the clean top goes in your recycling bin or to a recycling center, and the dirty bottom can go in your backyard compost bin.

For more information on waste reduction and recycling, visit RecycleSpot.org or call (816) 474-4326.

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Paper towels absorb more than spills

Without a thought, we grab a handful of paper towels to dry our hands in a public restroom or to clean up a spill in the kitchen and then we toss them in the trash. But what is the environmental cost? A lot of energy and resources go into making paper towels: harvesting the wood, processing it, bleaching it, packaging it, and transporting it — all just to reach the store! However, there is a great way to counter this resource and energy-intensive process: just say no.

papertowels-credit-SCA Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget

In the restroom

In the old days, people used to carry cloth handkerchiefs. Today these make great paper towel substitutes. You can purchase handkerchiefs at most department stores, and a good one can last for many years. Keep one in your pocket or purse and use it when wet hands arise. If you’re worried about the dampness affecting other items, you can keep the handkerchief in a Ziploc bag between uses, or lay it out to dry on a desk. Wash handkerchiefs with the rest of your laundry.

In the kitchen

All bath towels must be retired at some point, so why not give those frayed and faded towels a second life in your kitchen? Store them in a kitchen cabinet or drawer, ready to be used the next time Junior spills his milk. Just like the hankies, these towels can go in with your laundry and serve many years as a greener, quicker picker-upper.

If all else fails, compost!

If you do end up using paper towels, they can be disposed of in your compost bin instead of the trash. Find information on composting at home on the MARC website.

For more information on waste reduction and recycling, visit RecycleSpot.org or call (816) 474-4326.

 

photo credit: SCA Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget via photopin cc
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Fight food waste at your festivities

AppetizersFood: it’s the center of every holiday gathering.

But between thinking about all those calories and the sheer quantity of food, most of us don’t consider how much of it gets wasted.  In fact, the average American wastes between 209 and 253 pounds of food every year, with a fair amount of that waste occurring around the holidays. Here are some ways to reduce waste that will help you, your guests and the environment.

  • Precycle. “Precycling” is when you avoid purchasing unnecessary items that will eventually have to be recycled or thrown away. For holiday meals, try to purchase products with less packaging, use durable dishware and cook only for the number of people who will eat at your gathering.
  • Prepare healthy portions. Love Food Hate Waste’s online portion planner will tell you how much food to purchase based on the type of food you want to serve and the number of people who will eat it.
  • Make a list and stick with it. A list will ensure you don’t forget anything and keep you from buying and spending too much.
  • Let guests serve themselves. When guests serve themselves they can choose the items they actually want to eat.
  • Use smaller plates. Smaller plates help fend off the dreaded “my-eyes-are-bigger-than-my-stomach” syndrome.
  • Ask guests to bring reusable containers. This way you won’t have to eat all those leftovers yourself and your guests will have something to eat the next day. Plus you’ll reuse others’ containers instead of buying new ones.

Don’t forget to visit RecycleSpot.org for all of your holiday reuse and recycling needs!

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Pendleton Heights Curbside Compost Program – powered by bicycle!

The MARC Solid Waste Management District administers an annual grant program that awards funds to local communities and organizations for waste reduction and recycling-related projects. From time to time, we publish updates about recent grant recipients.

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Jerusalem Farm, a nonprofit and intentional community, was awarded a 2013 grant to provide weekly curbside collection of compostable materials to the Pendleton Heights neighborhood located in northeast Kansas City.

Volunteers collect compostable materials once a week from participating residents using buckets and bicycles. The buckets were diverted from local grocery store bakeries and would have otherwise been destined for disposal. They were cleaned, spray painted with the program logo and provided to participating households. Revolve KC, another SWMD grantee, supplied the bicycles at a reduced cost. The farm plans to use a truck during the colder months.

Curbside collection of compostable material

The collected material will be composted on farm property. Finished compost will be given to participating residents or used in the farm’s community garden lots.

The collection program began in June and has diverted nearly 2.5 tons of material (including the buckets).  To date, the program has 41 residential participants.  More information about the program is available on the Jerusalem Farm website.

 

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