Tag Archives: Solid Waste Management District

Congratulations to our 2017 SWMD grantees!

photos of books, recycling receptacle and food waste/kitchen scrapsOne of the most important things the MARC Solid Waste Management District (SWMD) does is provide financial support to organizations on the Missouri side of our region for projects that reduce the amount of material we send to landfills. The district receives funding every year from the fees collected from the landfills and transfer stations in Missouri. Half of that amount is used to fund local waste reduction, reuse and recycling projects through a grant program. So far this year, we have awarded more than $407,146 to 11 grantees.

The 2017 grant projects so far include:

  • Avenue of Life:  $59,428 to support the fourth year of a regional mattress recycling program.
  • Bridging The Gap: $81,187 to provide one-on-one consultations and assistance to businesses interested in starting new or expanding existing recycling and composting programs.
  • City of Grandview:  $23,625 to purchase a recycling trailer for events and staffing for management and education.
  • Composting and Organics Association of Missouri: $8,202 to conduct a regional composting workshop.
  • Folk Alliance: $3,608 to support staffing, signage, and recycling and composting bags for the annual conference at the Westin Hotel in Kansas City.
  • Independence Avenue Community Improvement District:  $17,500 to purchase recycling containers and bags and provide recycling education on Independence Avenue in Kansas City.
  • Kansas City Chiefs: $21,981 to purchase dual containers to collect compostables and recyclables from fans.
  • Mid-America Regional Council:  $48,267 for Recycle More advertising and outreach.
  • Project Central: $120,708 to support the third year of consultations for school composting and/or recycling programs.
  • Scraps KC: $10,881 to provide support for a newly opened creative reuse store.
  • The Rehabilitation Institute:  $11,759 to support the sale of used books online.

We are very proud of our 2017 group of grant recipients and excited about their projects. The district could not accomplish its waste diversion goals without our grantees! Visit the Solid Waste Management District’s website to learn more about the grant program.

Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

On the road again? Don’t forget to recycle.

You may be a master recycler at home, but what about when you’re on the road? Summer vacations are just around the corner. Wherever your travels might take you, be sure to reduce, reuse and recycle along the way.  Here are some helpful tips:

Pack it in, recycle it out Many national parks offer recycling. So whether your camping or just driving the park loop, please help keep our national parks clean and green. Photo Caption: Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone National park

  • Check ahead — Planning for recycling on your road trip is just as important as remembering to pack your tooth brush and phone charger. Contact the places you’ll be staying (campground, motel, resort, etc.) to find out what recycling services they offer. Once you arrive, lodging staff should be able to direct you to a recycling location on- or off-site. Another great resource is iRecycle, an app developed by Earth911 to provide recycling information and locations for the USA, and parts of Mexico and Canada. Both EnvironmentallyFriendlyHotels.com and the Green Hotel Association can help you find lodging that offers recycling.
  • Contain it — You’ll need a way to contain your recyclables and trash while you’re on the road. Bring a container (bag, bin, etc.) for each. If you’re staying someplace that doesn’t offer recycling, bring your own container to hold recyclables until you reach someplace that does.
  • Let it rot — If you compost at home, you can compost on the road, too. Take an airtight plastic container or two to store your compostables until you get back home.
  • Reduce packaging — Space is always at a premium when you’re on the road, so choose items with little or no packaging. Avoid items that are individually wrapped. If you end up with candy wrappers or chip bags, check with TerraCycle, a company that prides itself in recycling everything.
  • Leave only small “food prints” — Eating out on the road is expensive both in terms of your pocket book and energy and resources. Pre-purchase snacks, drinks and food, keep perishables in a cooler, and visit a local grocery store when you run low.
  • Go for unique souvenirs — Consider buying goods by local artists to support the local economy and buy fair trade items when available. If you’re buying gifts for others, use your old road map or a brochure as gift wrap.
  • Pack your reusable bags — Always pack a few reusable bags for souvenirs and those on-the-road grocery stops.
  • Just say no to “Would you like a box for that?” — Remember to take plastic food storage containers for your restaurant leftovers. They’re easier to pack in a cooler than flimsy takeout containers, and they keep food fresh longer.
  • Reduce, reuse, rehydrate — Take reusable mugs and bottles for all your road trip drinks.

For information on where you can take your recyclables once you get home, visit RecycleSpot.org, Kansas City metro area’s one-stop spot for recycling, reuse and waste reduction information.

Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

Congratulations to our 2016 SWMD grantees!

Photos of past grantee projects, and/or district grant priority target materials. From top to bottom: Man deconstructing a mattress, receptacles for recycling and trash, used books, woman collecting food waste, bicycles.One of the most important things the MARC Solid Waste Management District (SWMD) does is provide financial support to organizations in our region for projects that reduce the amount of material we send to landfills. The district receives funding every year from the fees collected from the state’s landfills and transfer stations. Half of that amount is used to fund local waste reduction, reuse and recycling projects through a grant program. So far this year, we have awarded more than $515,000 to eight grantees. Another $70,000 in grant funding is in the final stages of being awarded.

The 2016 grant projects so far include:

  • Access Records Management: $50,000 to provide recycling services to businesses.
  • Avenue of Life: $51,140 to support the third year of a regional mattress recycling program.
  • Bridging The Gap: $80,000 to provide one-on-one consultations and assistance to businesses interested in starting new or expanding existing recycling and composting programs.
  • Dr. Joseph Martinich: $12,984 to produce a study on the economics of recycling for the Kansas City region.
  • Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences: $9,000 to improve the campus recycling program.
  • MRC Recycling: $5,000 for a baler to manage plastic material.
  • Missouri Organic: $206,233 to support infrastructure development for the placement of a food depackaging system (equipment that separates food items from their packaging material, including plastic and cans).
  • Project Central: $101,143 to support the second year of consultations for school composting and/or recycling programs.

We are very proud of our 2016 group of grant recipients and excited about their projects. The district could not accomplish its waste diversion goals without our grantees! Visit the Solid Waste Management District’s website to learn more about the grant program.

Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

MARC Solid Waste Management District awards luncheon recognizes regional leaders

Photo of people that accepted the MARC Solid Waste Management District's Special Recognition awards. From left, 2015 awardees Gabriella Sanders, JR Pesek, Alan Waterman and Marie Steiner.The MARC Solid Waste Management District held its 2015 Annual Meeting and Awards Luncheon on Friday, Dec. 11, at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center. Elizabeth Cline, the author of “OVERDRESSED: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion” spoke about the lack of sustainability in the fast-fashion industry. The district also recognized several individuals and organizations that have made notable contributions to regional waste management and recycling efforts. See photos from the event on Flickr » The 2015 Special Recognition Award recipients include:

Individual Supporter — JR Pesek, Town and Country Disposal
The Individual Supporter award recognizes an individual who has made exceptional contributions and commitment to the district’s waste reduction and recycling efforts.
Public Employee — Jim Eldridge, Kearney, Missouri
The Public Employee award recognizes a public employee who has shown dedication to the development and advancement of waste reduction and recycling through individual achievement and commitment. Alderwoman Marie Steiner accepted the award on behalf of Jim Eldridge.
Outstanding Program — 909 Walnut
The Outstanding Program award recognizes an innovative or outstanding waste reduction or recycling program. Alan Waterman, general manager for 909 Walnut, accepted this award.
Every Little Bit Counts — Gabriella Sanders, The Greener Life Market
The “Every Little Bit Counts” award recognizes that small actions are meaningful.
Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

Paper towels absorb more than spills

Without a thought, we grab a handful of paper towels to dry our hands in a public restroom or to clean up a spill in the kitchen and then we toss them in the trash. But what is the environmental cost? A lot of energy and resources go into making paper towels: harvesting the wood, processing it, bleaching it, packaging it, and transporting it — all just to reach the store! However, there is a great way to counter this resource and energy-intensive process: just say no.

papertowels-credit-SCA Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget

In the restroom

In the old days, people used to carry cloth handkerchiefs. Today these make great paper towel substitutes. You can purchase handkerchiefs at most department stores, and a good one can last for many years. Keep one in your pocket or purse and use it when wet hands arise. If you’re worried about the dampness affecting other items, you can keep the handkerchief in a Ziploc bag between uses, or lay it out to dry on a desk. Wash handkerchiefs with the rest of your laundry.

In the kitchen

All bath towels must be retired at some point, so why not give those frayed and faded towels a second life in your kitchen? Store them in a kitchen cabinet or drawer, ready to be used the next time Junior spills his milk. Just like the hankies, these towels can go in with your laundry and serve many years as a greener, quicker picker-upper.

If all else fails, compost!

If you do end up using paper towels, they can be disposed of in your compost bin instead of the trash. Find information on composting at home on the MARC website.

For more information on waste reduction and recycling, visit RecycleSpot.org or call (816) 474-4326.

 

photo credit: SCA Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget via photopin cc
Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

Creating Connections 2014

IMG_9333_crop-color-corrected-caption

The MARC Solid Waste Management District held its 2014 Annual Meeting and Awards Luncheon on Wednesday, Dec. 17, at the Kauffman Foundation Conference Center. Amy Bond, CBRE, spoke about sustainability and recycling programs at the Sprint Campus as well as at Sprint’s nationwide real estate operations. The district also recognized several individuals and organizations that have made notable contributions to regional waste management and recycling efforts. The 2014 Special Recognition Award recipients were:

Individual Supporter — Angie Gehlert, Missouri Recycling Association

The Individual Supporter award recognizes an individual who has made exceptional contributions and commitment to the district’s waste reduction and recycling efforts.

Public Employee — Chris Bussen, Lee’s Summit

The Public Employee award recognizes a public employee who has shown dedication to the development and advancement of waste reduction and recycling through individual achievement and commitment.

Green Event — Waddell & Reed Kansas City Marathon

The Green Event award recognizes a special event that promotes sustainable practices. Stephanie Lankford with the Kansas City Sports Commission accepted this award.

Waste Industry — The Urban Lumber Company

The Waste Industry award recognizes outstanding waste reduction and recycling efforts for a business in the waste industry. Tim O’Neill accepted this award.

Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

How much trash do you send to the landfill?

trashThe answer depends on who you ask and how you define “trash.” There are two main sources for nationwide solid waste management data in the United States:

The two sources use different methodologies and as a result provide different answers to the question. The EPA determines the size of the waste stream using manufacturing production data, estimates of product imports and exports and estimated product life. Estimates for the generation of food and yard waste are based on sampling studies. EPA has used this methodology consistently for over 40 years, which allows for analyses of long-term trends. EPA defines “municipal solid waste” — or trash, as most of us call it — as everyday items such as product packaging, grass clippings, furniture, clothing, bottles, cans, food scraps, newspapers, appliances, consumer electronics and batteries. These items come from homes, institutions such as schools and hospitals, and commercial sources such as restaurants and small businesses. EPA’s definition does not include municipal wastewater treatment sludge, industrial process waste, automobile bodies, combustion ash or construction and demolition debris. The editors of BioCycle Magazine began a national survey in 1989 using state-gathered data from disposal, recycling and composting facilities. While this methodology uses actual tonnages, it should be noted that states do not define municipal solid waste consistently. For example, states often include non-hazardous solid wastes — such as construction and demolition debris and industrial waste — in their data, unlike the EPA. So, what is the answer to the original question? How much trash DO you send to the landfill?

  • EPA estimates that the average American produced 4.38 pounds of trash per day in 2012. About a third of that was recycled and the remaining 2.87 pounds were burned or sent to a landfill.
  • The latest BioCycle national survey, conducted by Columbia University, estimates that each person generated 6.84 pounds of trash per day in 2011. Again, approximately a third of that was recycled or composted and the remaining 4.86 pounds were burned or sent to a landfill.

Stay tuned for a post that will look closer to home and assess regional data to better answer this question.

Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

Congratulations to our 2014 SWMD grantees!

One of the most important things the MARC Solid Waste Management District does is provide financial support to organizations in our region for projects that reduce the material we send to landfills. The district receives funding every year from the fees collected from the state’s landfills and transfer stations. Half of that amount is used to fund local waste reduction, reuse and recycling projects through a grant program.

We are very proud of our 2014 group of grant recipients and excited about their projects. The district could not accomplish its waste diversion goals without our grantees!

The 2014 grant projects are:

  • Avenue of Life: $173,371 to develop a regional mattress recycling program.
  • Bridging The Gap:  $23,900 to provide one-on-one consultations and assistance to businesses interested in starting new or expanding existing recycling programs.
  • City of Blue Springs: $5,100 to purchase recycling bins for four city parks.
  • City of Riverside, Mo.: $3,210 for marketing and vendor costs for the 2014 Northland Recycling Extravaganza.
  • Friends of the City Market: $20,000 to provide support staff to assist River Market vendors in separating food waste for composting.
  • Grain Valley School District: $7,800 to start a food waste composting program in two schools.
  • Jackson County, Mo.: $64,632 to support start-up costs for a regional drop-off yard waste facility.
  • The Rehabilitation Institute: $31,240 to purchase a truck for transporting collected books to support the third year of a successful book recycling project.
  • Ripple Glass: $6,380 for a traveling educational display to encourage glass recycling.
  • Southeast Enterprises: $8,500 to support transportation costs associated with a regional holiday light recycling program.
  • Trozzolo Communications Group: $195,075 to develop a regional recycling education and marketing campaign.

Visit the Solid Waste Management District’s website to learn more about the grant program.

Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

Recycle your ride

recycle-tiresAre you a do-it-yourselfer when it comes to auto maintenance? If so, you probably have a couple of tires or containers of used motor oil sitting around your garage that you’d like to see go. Or, perhaps you have an entire old car you want to get rid of. Luckily there are plenty of automotive recycling options in our region.

Batteries, Tires, Motor Oil and Filters

Most full-service automotive centers will recycle used motor oil and automotive batteries for free, and tires for a small fee. Auto parts stores and quick lube places generally accept used motor oil and batteries as well. Some locations even recycle oil filters. Always call first to check that items are accepted.

Household hazardous waste facilities also accept automotive batteries and fluids, including oil, antifreeze, brake fluid, power steering fluid and more.

  • RecycleSpot.org search terms: Batteries, Tires, Automotive Fluids, Oil Filters

Salvage

Old vehicles that are beyond repair are ideal for salvaging. Many automotive salvage yards, used auto parts dealers and even some scrap metal dealers will take that old car off your hands. Generally they will pay a modest amount for your vehicle and provide free pick up.

Donation

There are many organizations that accept vehicles for donation. Generally they’ll take your car (running or not), provide free pickup, help with the title and paperwork, and help you get the highest possible tax deduction. Contact your favorite charity to see if it has a vehicle donation program.

For more information on recycling automotive materials, visit RecycleSpot.org. Under “I want to recycle” you can click “More Search Options” to filter by material, salvage or donation.

Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit

Sleepyhead Beds: Helping children in need and keeping mattresses out of landfills

sleepyhead beds vanThe MARC Solid Waste Management District administers an annual grant program that awards funds to local communities and organizations for waste reduction and recycling-related projects. From time to time, we publish updates about recent grant recipients.

Most of us will likely have a few mattresses throughout our lifetimes. What did you do with your last mattress after you bought a new one? Instead of throwing out an old mattress, you can do something good for kids in the Kansas City region and for the environment.

If your old mattress is still in reasonable shape, with no noticeable stains or structural problems, you can donate it to Sleepyhead Beds. Sleepyhead Beds is a local organization that takes gently used, unwanted mattresses and sanitizes and sterilizes them for redistribution to children in need. The organization also accepts donations of clean, gently used sheets, comforters and pillow cases.

In 2013, Sleepyhead Beds received a grant from the MARC Solid Waste Management District to purchase a truck and hire a driver to expand its program for collecting and redistributing beds and bedding. This helped Sleepyhead Beds redistribute more than 1,600 mattresses and 1,200 pounds of bedding. If you lined up those mattresses end to end, they would stretch over two miles!

Reusing mattresses also saves a lot of time and energy since recycling them can be very difficult. Plus, any mattress that ends up in a landfill takes up a lot of space. If the 1,600 mattresses redistributed by Sleepyhead Beds were all twin-sized they would take up 27,000 cubic feet, or enough space to cover a basketball court eight times. (That would make it much easier to dunk!)

To learn more or to arrange a donation, visit Sleepyhead Bed’s website.

Share via emailShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin it on Pinterest+1Digg ThisSubmit to reddit